Posts Tagged ‘port of spain’

IMG_2287

 My friend took me to Veni Mangé in Port of Spain, Trinidad last week for lunch. Here was my experience. Sign paying homage to Allyson Hennessy above.

“Veni Mangé came into existence in December 1980. The name Veni Mangé is French Patois for ‘Come & Eat’ Now located on the popular Ariapita Avenue, the restaurant is housed in old Colonial home, clay colored with demerara windows, local art, tropical plants, colorful décor and overhead ceiling fans. It epitomises Caribbean ambiance. Veni Mangé is run by sisters, Allyson Hennessy (deceased – pictured above), a Cordon Bleu Chef and sister, Roses Hezekiah.” – from Veni Mange website.

We were warmly greeted by Roses (I think it was Roses) who was the epitome of the Caribbean woman, beautiful, warm, felt like family, and a beautiful smile. She escorted us to our seats, asking us where we preferred and opening the windows for us to enjoy the breeze.

IMG_2256

 Coconut Bake

Before placing your order you are greeted by beautiful and delicious coconut bake! This is a Trinbagonian past-time. It was and still is one of the most comforting things for me to eat when I come home to Trinidad. My grandmother’s coconut bake was unforgettable. In addition to the bake looking so inviting, I loved the checkered towel it was placed in. Oh so homey!

IMG_2266

I ordered grilled shrimp in chadon bene sauce (chadon bene is a family to cilantro) and my friend ordered the West Indian stewed beef with dumplings. Our entrees were served with (pictured above) bhagi rice (from top left), potato salad and fried plantains, vegetables (which was really pak choi) and red beans. Oh it was a feast!!!!!!!!!!! It looked and smelled sooooooooooo good! But the pièce de résistance was about to arrive..

IMG_2265

Close up of the bhagi rice

IMG_2264

Potato salad and fried plantains

IMG_2263

Stewed red beans

IMG_2262

Pak choi

Now for the entrees…

IMG_2267

Stewed beef with dumplings. Five-finger a.k.a star fruit a.k.a carambola for decoration.

IMG_2268

Another view with some watercress too.

IMG_2271

This was my baby, my darling, just looking at this and my mouth is watering again…grilled shrimp in chadon bene sauce

IMG_2270

Now, if memory serves me right the menu said “grilled shrimp.” I didn’t taste the grill on the shrimp, BUT the shrimps was one of the most delicious tasting shrimps I have ever had! It tasted like a chadon bene ceviche or a shrimp chow! BEST THING EVER!!

IMG_2269

Another view! I ate my sides and left the majority of my shrimp for last.

IMG_2272

We left room for dessert. I had the rum trifle and my friend had the prune dessert with custard (I can’t remember the name).

IMG_2275

Inside the run trifle

IMG_2276

A closer view of inside the rum trifle.

IMG_2273

The prune dessert

IMG_2274

Inside the prune dessert

 The desserts were great! If I were Veni Mangé however I would place the trifle in a clear glass or bowl. The beauty of a trifle lies not just in its taste, but also in its layers. Glass dish – yes. I would also put a lighter layer of custard atop. The entire thing was a little too sweet and I felt the custard overwhelmed the delicious fruits and cake below a bit. I would do the same for the prune dessert. They were both great however. Now for the decor…

IMG_2278

The brightly colored furniture, windows, ceiling fans, demerara windows, colorful artwork depicting Caribbean life and Caribbean people. The seat covers are reminiscent of  the dresses worn by bélé dancers in the Caribbean.

IMG_2277

Brightly colored furniture and jalousie windows (with louvers).

IMG_2261

The artwork and plants…

IMG_2280

A close up of the painted table top and beautiful tile

IMG_2260

More of the interior

IMG_2259


IMG_2258

IMG_2286

IMG_2283

 White painted ceiling, demerara windows, wooden floor and furniture at the bar

IMG_2284

A wall of famous Trinidadians

IMG_2285

Demerara windows

IMG_2289

View of Veni Mangé from the outside

IMG_2288

Exterior sign

I thank Rose and the young lady who waited on my friend and I. This was fantastic! The food was some of the best I have ever tasted. The service was PERFECT! I felt comfortable, they kept asking us if everything was alright and if we wanted anything else. I am a sucker for fantastic service and they gave it to us, all with that beautiful Caribbean smile and warmth.

  1. Food – GREAT
  2. Service – GREAT
  3. Ambiance – GREAT

Here’s a ink to the restaurant – http://www.venimange.com

Have a great one!

Thinking Insomniac.

Advertisements

Sagicor, POS, Trinidad-sm

6” x 8.5” Pen, ink,  and Sharpie in Ryman sketchbook

I am in Trinidad for a few days and I felt the nostalgia of my time sketching the wonderful buildings in Port of Spain. I passed by the Sagicor Building and wanted to sketch it again. It’s a beauty!

Thinking Insomniac

 

 

Today I chose to post my Visual Recipe for Cheddar Biscuits which I love so much, but haven’t had in a while. Hope you have a great day, and if you do make any… please mail me one.. 😉

Visual Recipe-Cheddar Biscuits

I leave you with this song to start your weekend..

“Blame it on the music!!”

HAPPY FRIDAY!!!!

Creative Commons License
This work by Vernelle Noel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Hayes Court, vernelle noel, thinking insomniac, architecture, port of spain, trinidad

Hayes Court, Trinidad

9” x 12” Strathmore sketchbook, ink pens, & Sharpies

This is a sketch of Hayes Court in Port of Spain, Trinidad. This is the second of four sketches I have done thus far of the ‘Magnificent Seven (a series of mansions by the Queen’s Park Savannah). Hayes Court is after the Queen’s Royal College. This building was completed in 1910 by the firm of Taylor Gilles at a cost of £15, 700. It was named “Hayes Court” after Bishop Thomas Hayes, who was the second Bishop of the Anglican Diocese of Trinidad & Tobago.

Hayes Court, Trinidad, vernelle noel, thinking insomniac

Hayes Court, Trinidad - Photo by Vernelle Noel

Architecturally it reflects a combination of the quiet graciousness of the French and English country house design, with its high ceilings, mahogany staircase, wrought-iron fretwork, and wood paneling. Iron fretwork and a beautiful porte cochere or coach doorway are features of this classic mansion.

Today, July 27th, is the 21st Anniversary of the attempted coup on the Government of Trinidad and Tobago in 1990. Led by Abu Bakr, the Jamaat al Muslimeen invaded The Red House (seat of the country’s parliament), and took the Prime Minister hostage, along with members of his cabinet, government and opposition MPs, and others – some seventeen in all. About 24 people died during the coup attempt, with millions in property losses. More here >>

Our Republic forever changed on that day. Our Capital City of Port of Spain, had to be rebuilt as buildings were burned, and looted. Very often I feel that as a nation, our appreciation of our history leaves much to be desired. I see it in the way we treat our historic buildings, our national heroes, and our award-winners, to name a few. This day of July 27th should never be “just another day.” We must never forget what occurred on this day, and I would like to see a stronger expression of our commemoration of this day.

I believe July 27th should embrace six major principles (adapted from the United Nations Statement of Commitment adopted for Holocaust Memorial Day):

  1. The July 27th, 1990 attempted coup shook the foundations of Trinbagonian democracy and civilization. Its horror should always hold meaning.
  2. The July 27th, 1990 attempted coup must have a permanent place in Trinbagonians’ collective memory.
  3. Future generations must understand the causes of the July 27th attempted coup and reflect upon its consequences.
  4. The sacrifices of those who lost and risked their lives to protect or rescue victims are a touchstone of the Trinbagonian capacity for good.
  5. Education and research about the July 27th attempted coup must be promoted.
  6. An annual July 27th Memorial Day should take place to commemorate this human tragedy and condemn violence, lawlessness, and indiscipline.

Reference: As Time Goes on It’s Vital We Never Forget One of the Darkest Times in World History by Dan Cohn-Sherbok

“Memorials are important because they act as historical touchstones. They link the past to the present and enable people to remember and respect the sacrifice of those who died, fought, participated or were affected by conflict(s).”

Abstract Architecture for the day:

abstract architecture, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel3.5″ x 5″ Strathmore Sketchbook, ink pens and Sharpies

Creative Commons License
This work byVernelle Noel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

university of the west indies, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, uwi, trinidad, negative, sketch, architect

UWI Admin Building - St. Augustine, Trinidad

This is a negative of a sketch I did of the Administrative Building at the University of the West Indies in St. Augustine, Trinidad. Here is the original sketch >>>.

Abstract Architecture for the day:

 

abstract architecture, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel

Creative Commons License
This work by Vernelle Noel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

City Hall, San Fernando, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, sketchcrawl

City Hall, San Fernando

Thanks again for a great event SketchCrawlers! It was my second time and I enjoy this sooo much!!! This SketchCrawl I went to the southern city of San Fernando in Trinidad & Tobago. Here are my sketches and I look forward to the other one!!

San Fernando, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, sketchcrawl, Hospital

San Fernando Hospital, Trinidad

San Fernando, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, sketchcrawl

Buildings in San Fernando

Go here to the SketchCrawl page >> or More on Flickr >>>

Abstract Architecture for the day:

thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, never too late
George Eliot
English novelist (1819 – 1880)

Creative Commons License
This work byVernelle Noel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Queens Royal College, Trinidad, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, sketch, architecture, urban sketchers, caribbean

Queens Royal College, Trinidad

9” x 12” Strathmore sketchbook, ink pens, & Sharpies

This is a sketch of “The Main Block” of Queen’s Royal College (QRC) in Trinidad. This is one of four sketches I did on Tuesday. QRC is a bastion of secondary education for boys in Trinidad. The Main Block is so called because it was the first structure on the site, complete with a double row of broad galleries, clock-tower and chiming clock. It is one of the architectural “jewels in the crown” of Port of Spain; one of the ‘Magnificent Seven,’ which is a series of mansions by the Queen’s Park Savannah. These were built to flaunt the wealth of the early 20th-century cocoa barons and other notables, all dating from 1904.

QRC, vernelle noel, thnking insomniac

Left

QRC, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel

Right

In my sketch, if you look carefully you will notice that the left and right facades at the ends are different. See photos above. I do not know how they ended up being different, but I find the quirk quite attractive, and very interesting. I would love to know about this. Previous Post on the QRC Clock Tower >>

Abstract Architecture for the day:abstract architecture, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, architect

Creative Commons License

This work by Vernelle Noel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Museum of Port of Spain, Trinidad, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, architecture

Museum of Port of Spain, Trinidad

6” x 8.5” Pen, ink,  and Sharpie in Ryman sketchbook
 

This is a sketch of the Museum of the City of Port of Spain (not to be confused with the National Museum). It’s located on the corner of South Quay and Frederick Street. I have never been in it, but it always catches my attention. Its simplicity, galleries, the rhythm of the slender posts and balustrades, the punched openings, the roof… I like this building very much. The lower floor appears as a strong form, a rectangular bar with punched openings… The four smaller openings mirror each other on either side of the building, but the facade is asymmetrical. The slender posts extending from the ground to the roof creates a lovely rhythm matching the openings in the walls, balustrades, and the roof. It feels light…shading, cooling and covering the heavier, thicker walls below. A fantastic example of Caribbean architecture.

Abstract Architecture for the day:

things happen for a reason, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, architect, illustration, abstract architecture

Creative Commons License
This work by Vernelle Noel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Visual Recipe, Greek Salad Pita Sandwich, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, architect, sketch, illustration

Visual Recipe - Greek Salad Pita Sandwich

Today’s Visual Recipe is a Greek Salad Pita Sandwich courtesy http://renascence309.wordpress.com and http://www.epicurious.com. I love sandwiches! I used to make this a lot, with a twist of course. Many times I would include chicken or tuna in my salad to add body, weight and protein to it, and pepper sauce for some heat. I toasted the pita just before putting the salad in as that warm, slight crisp of the bread with the juicy, cool salad would be… just scrumptious! Perfect meal for warm days.

Thanks Pam and Fray.

Link to recipe >>> and …another link >>>

HAPPY FRIDAY!!!!

thinking insomniac, vernelle noel

Creative Commons License
This work by Vernelle Noel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

one woodbrook place, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, architect

One Woodbrook Place in Port of Spain, Trinidad

Above is a negative of my sketch of One Woodbrook Place in Port of Spain, Trinidad that I did for Sketchcrawl earlier this year. Hope you enjoy! More links to One Woodbrook Place >>>

The global economy has definitely slowed down and in some cases halted the construction industry, making it challenging for many, including architects (and engineers). Architects are sending out proposal after proposal and hoping… Others have been forced to close their offices, and yet others keep pounding the pavements looking for projects and/ or employment. This recession has also brought out the ugly side of some architects, sad to say. Architects and firms that offer unpaid positions to employees, or want consultant services for free… architects who eat their young. There is a blog by that name, whose mission is to expose firms’ exploitation of intern architects (Click here for blog >>>). I often wonder what thought process goes through a person’s mind to be that callous, that inhumane, that immoral, that unethical, that disrespectful to ask that another human being work for NOTHING.

Architects (in some regions) have failed in my opinion, to occupy a seat at the table with the public. They have instead taken seats in ivory towers and been very slow to being present, being on the ground, being visible; educating the public, educating students, clients, governments, and educating themselves. No wonder the public thinks architects “draw plans.” Instead of being professionals with values (like those in the past), some have sold themselves for the Almighty Dollar, looking for the cheap way out. Instead of helping each other, they become crabs in a bucket, pulling each other down while fighting to get to the top.

Being a professional means that you are more than likely bound by a Code of Ethics, and this practice of “no pay” is HIGHLY UNETHICAL. When you ask a professional to work for free, he/she is in fact paying you to do the work. Not even offering to cover their basic needs, respecting that they (and their families) have incurred costs and sacrificed for their education is just unthinkable. Anyone asking a professional to work for free is doing a disservice to their country and the public. A professional asking a fellow professional to work for no pay is even worse and tantamount to cannibalism…professional cannibalism.

The stability, power and longevity of a tribe is directly related to the way it is treated by its members. When many of them seek to take, to enrich themselves and to find a loophole or advantage, the group is weakened. Culture and management are not the same thing–when we strengthen our organization, when we encourage and respect our fellow employees, management follows. Group up, not top down – Seth Godin

When architects resort to eating their young, their fellow professionals, their mentees…offering them nothing for an honest days work…I hope they expect the same. Disrespect begets disrespect. The tribe we get is the tribe we build.

Links to this issue:

http://pimpingarchitects.blogspot.com/

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/03/business/03intern.html

http://committees.architects.org/idp/interntrap.pdf

http://archiseek.com/2011/aai-condemns-young-graduates-being-exploited/

Thought for the day:

determination, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, illustration, cartoon, architect

Creative Commons License
This work by Vernelle Noel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.