Posts Tagged ‘moleskine’

Industrial Court, Trinidad, Kresge, MIT, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, kresge, mit, cambridge, architecture,mit architecture, architectural sketches, architectural sketching, architect sketches, architectural sketches of buildings, architectural sketching techniques,  architecture sketchbook, architectural perspective, architecture sketches of houses, sketching buildings,

The Industrial Court of Trinidad & Tobago

Above is my drawing of the Industrial Court of Trinidad & Tobago; on the corner of Queen and St. Vincent Streets in Port of Spain.

“During the period 1960 to 1964, Trinidad and Tobago was plagued by a number of strikes by workers and lockouts by employers which affected the economy. The Government’s answer to the problem was the Industrial Stabilization Act 1965. This Act was “to provide for the compulsory recognition by employers of Trade Unions and Organizations representative of a majority or workers, for the establishment of an expeditious system for the settlement of Trade Disputes, for the regulation of prices of commodities, for the constitution of a Court to regulate matters relating to the foregoing an incedental thereto.”

Reference: http://industrialcourt.org.tt/Home.aspx

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This work byVernelle Noel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

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Visual Journal-25Aug2011-1 ti

Visual Journal - 25th August 2011

I hope all of you are alright after the weekend of Irene. I am currently in New York, a little longer than planned, as I am headed to Boston. I have been unable to upload my architecture sketches, so in the meanwhile I have posted my Visual Journals over the past few days for you. I haven’t been able to color and scan them either; I have taken photos and posted them for you. Hope you enjoy!

Visual Journal-26Aug2011-1 ti

Visual Journal - 26th August 2011

Visual Journal-28Aug2011-1 ti

Visual Journal - 28th August 2011

More on Flickr >>>

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The Industrial Court of Trinidad & Tobago, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, architecture, drawing, sketch, moleskine, watercolor, art, design

The Industrial Court of Trinidad & Tobago

Above is a sketch and watercolor of the Industrial Court on Trinidad & Tobago; on the corner of Queen and St. Vincent Streets in Port of Spain. I continue to work on my watercoloring techniques, and feel good about this one. I like this building. The awnings, the main entry, the articulation at the corner and treatment of the base of the building, well done. The Industrial Court looks very dramatic in and solid… like a court should be.

Abstract Architecture of the day:

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Queens Royal College, Trinidad, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, sketch, architecture, urban sketchers, caribbean

Queens Royal College, Trinidad

9” x 12” Strathmore sketchbook, ink pens, & Sharpies

This is a sketch of “The Main Block” of Queen’s Royal College (QRC) in Trinidad. This is one of four sketches I did on Tuesday. QRC is a bastion of secondary education for boys in Trinidad. The Main Block is so called because it was the first structure on the site, complete with a double row of broad galleries, clock-tower and chiming clock. It is one of the architectural “jewels in the crown” of Port of Spain; one of the ‘Magnificent Seven,’ which is a series of mansions by the Queen’s Park Savannah. These were built to flaunt the wealth of the early 20th-century cocoa barons and other notables, all dating from 1904.

QRC, vernelle noel, thnking insomniac

Left

QRC, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel

Right

In my sketch, if you look carefully you will notice that the left and right facades at the ends are different. See photos above. I do not know how they ended up being different, but I find the quirk quite attractive, and very interesting. I would love to know about this. Previous Post on the QRC Clock Tower >>

Abstract Architecture for the day:abstract architecture, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, architect

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restaurant, caribbean architecture, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, port of spain, trinidad

Building around QPS, Port of Spain, Trinidad

5” x 8.25” ink pens, in Moleskine sketchbook

This is a sketch of a building on the corner of Queens’ Park Savannah and Dundonald St. in Port of Spain, Trinidad. It is currently a restaurant, not sure what it was before. Its characteristics are very Caribbean with roof, fretwork, and windows to name a few. I like the building. On the lower floor however, they have placed glass in the arches so that patrons get the sense of openness and views in a controlled environment. I wonder if this could have been dealt with differently, better… probably leaving the gallery open or treating the fenestration differently.

Yesterday I read ARCHITECTS’ DRAWINGS – A Selection of Sketches by World Famous Architects Through History by Kendra Schank Smith and found the following excerpt defining sketches very fitting. It says: “Historically, the act of sketching or drawing on paper involves line. At its most basic level, the production of line constitutes making marks with a pointed tool, initiated by movement and force. In reverse, eyes follow a line and with that action the ‘line’s potential to suggest motion is basic’ (Lauer, 1979). A line, or mark, made with the bodily action of the hands, demonstrates its ability to cause reflective action, as it attracts the human eye to follow it. This cognition spurs associative thoughts, as the line suggests new forms (Lauer, 1979). Much of the ‘motion’ of a sketch comes from the physical action of the hand; in this way, the tool becomes an extension of the body and reflects the human body.

Architects contain within themselves the experiences and faculties necessary to interact with this visual stimulus, because the act of sketching is in some ways dependent upon memory. Thoughts, images, and experiences – all part of the architect’s whole being – determine what the sketch will be. Body memory, interpretation, and even specific items that are retained in memory over other experiences, influence what the architect sketches… Both as a method for retaining information and thoughts, and as a medium for inspiration and transformation, sketches constitute a personal dialogue for each architect.”

I have always found sketching to be very personal… sharing  myself with others. Kendra is correct about physical action being associated with a sketch…it can be very freeing, long strokes reaching forever, and therapeutic. It enables my eyes to “see” more, to see critically, remember details, know details, and think…incessantly. My hand is a brain, and the more I use it, and challenge it with exercises, the sharper they both become. Sketchcrawl is coming up again on July 23rd, I look forward to it, and I hope you join me too.

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watertaxi, trinidad, san fernando, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel

Waiting to board the Watertaxis in San Fernando,Trinidad

5” x 8.25” ink pens, in Moleskine sketchbook

As you know I LOVE boats. I did this sketch while waiting in the San Fernando terminal to board the water taxi heading to Port of Spain. I went to the southern part of the country (Princes Town), and on my way back up north, decided to saunter through the city to take some photos and do some sketches. The boat on the left is named “Carnival Runner” and on the right, “Calypso Sprinter.” The facilities are nice, and the boats are awesome. It was my first time. My plan was to stay awake and enjoy the sights, but I woke up 5 minutes from Port of Spain with that plan in the same spot in my mind. I had a quiet, peaceful, and energizing nap… smooth sailings!

thinking insomniac, vernelle noel

Watertaxi ticket

I love the fact that we get to experience the water via the water taxis. I wish I got a stronger sense that I was on an island while in the city of Port of Spain. It is one of my main disappointments… how cut off from the water I feel. This is what I loved about Barbados… I felt like I was on an island. The water taxis affords us this gift of being on the water, using that which we were given. I sketch boats, yachts, etc. from time to time… some are of real boats, others are of ideas that come to my mind. I did more yesterday… Click here to see them >>>

Dreams are free, so free your dreams

Astrid Alauda

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thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, National Academy for the Performing Arts, (NAPA), Port of Spain, Trinidad

Architecture Sketch – National Academy for the Performing Arts (NAPA), Port of Spain, Trinidad

5” x 8.25” ink pens, in Moleskine sketchbook
 

This is my second sketch of the front view of the National Academy of the Performing Arts in Port of Spain, Trinidad. Click here to see previous sketch.

Have a GREAT week ahead!

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Queens Royal College, trinidad, sketchblog, thinkinginsomniac, vernelle noel, architecture, caribbean

Queen's Royal College Clock Tower in Port of Spain, Trinidad

5” x 8.25” ink pens, in Moleskine sketchbook

This is a sketch of the Clock Tower of Queen’s Royal College (Q.R.C.) in Trinidad & Tobago (see photo below). The clock tower stands at 93 feet tall. QRC is located at the corner of St. Clair Avenue and Maraval Road in Port of Spain (around the Queen’s Park Savannah). The foundation stone for the building was laid on November 11, 1902 by Sir Courtenay Knollys. The design was done by Daniel Meinerts Hahn who was at the time the Chief Draftsman of the Public Works Department. The main block of the masterpiece is in a German Renaissance-style architecture which is evident by its solidness and ornateness. It was constructed at a cost of 15,000 pounds. The broad galleries and corridors were designed to allow the freest possible passage of air for physical comfort. The stonework was heavily employed in the construction to absorb the heat.

Reference – A Magnificent Nine by the Office of the Prime Minister of Trinidad & Tobago

Queen's Royal College in Port of Spain, Trinidad, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, sketchblog, architecture

Queen's Royal College in Port of Spain, Trinidad

Some notable graduates of QRC include:

  • Eric Eustace Williams – Historian, first Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago.
  • Sir Vidia Naipaul– Nobel-prize winning author. QRC is memorialised in his masterpiece, A House for Mr. Biswas.
  • Rudranath Capildeo – Mathematician, politician.
  • C.L.R. James – Pre-eminent Caribbean philosopher, historian, novelist, essayist, political theorist and cricket writer.
  • Derek Walcott – Nobel Prize winner, Poet, playwright, writer and visual artist.
  • Lloyd Best – Economist, essayist, politician, scholar. Founder of the ‘Plantation school’ of Economics.
  • Peter Minshall – Artist, Trinidad carnival mas man, designer of opening ceremony for the Olympic Games of Atlanta 1996, Emmy Award Winner.
  • Wendell Mottley – 1964 Olympic silver medalist and politician. Former Minister of Finance.
  • Deryck Murray – West Indian wicket-keeper in cricket.
  • Karl Hudson-Phillips – Jurist, politician. Former judge of the International Criminal Court and former Attorney General of Trinidad and Tobago.
  • Richard Thompson – Athlete and 2008 Olympic medalist – 100m; 4x100m relay
  • Marc Burns – Athlete and 2008 Olympic medalist – 4x100m relay
  • George Maxwell Richards – Engineer, academician, current President of Trinidad and Tobago.
  • Eric A. Williams – Geologist, former politician and Minister of Energy.

The building recently underwent a restoration. During the restoration process, paint was carefully stripped to uncover the original colors, revealing in the classrooms, hand-painted dado panels in different designs, framed by stenciled and hand-painted border friezes. These original panels will be restored to their original splendor in selected areas. External colors have also been restored to the original colors.

Reference – Strabon – Caraibes

Features of Renaissance Buildings:

  • Symmetrical arrangement of windows and doors
  • Extensive use of Classical columns and pilasters
  • Triangular pediments
  • Square lintels
  • Arches
  • Domes
  • Niches with sculptures

The Renaissance was a period of intense intellectual probing, of the reexamination of Classical literature, art, and architecture. The Renaissance artist-architect shared in this curiosity. Beginning with Brunelleschi, architects made the pilgrimage to ancient Rome, then a sleepy medieval town greatly shrunken from its imperial grandeur, to study and measure Roman ruins. They proposed to equal or surpass the artistic achievement of antiquity, but not to make literal copies of ancient architecture.

Understanding Architecture: Its Elements, History, and Meaning by Leland M. Roth

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thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, caribbean architecture, trinidad

Building on New St. in Port of Spain, Trinidad

5” x 8.25” ink pens, in Moleskine sketchbook

This is a sketch of a building on New Street in Port of Spain, Trinidad. It is obliquely opposite this one >>>. This building is characteristic of the Caribbean tradition of using good ventilation methods like sash windows with louvres at each side. It expresses a careful regard for the hot, wet, humid climate. Large eaves and overhangs protect walls from the harsh Caribbean sun, and walls of jalousies (louvres), and high level openings allow penetrating breezes to cool interiors. In the sketch above the wall is composed of windows, jalousies, and fretwork (ornamental open woodwork)…all aiding in ventilation; and creating a dynamic play of solid and void, light and shade, rectilinear and decorative. Notice dormer window, and the overhang of the upper story to protect the walls of the lower floor and passersby from the sun and rains (like I spoke of in this post >>).

“The basic function of a tropical building was to offer simple protection from rain and sun. This awareness eliminated many of the superficial elements of nostalgic colonial building. More appreciation for the out-of-doors allowed the garden to become an important part of the living environment, which led to connecting architectural elements between the out-of-doors and the building enclosure: galleries, verandas, porches, balconies, larger windows, louvered shutters, walls composed almost entirely of doors, and so on. Even the extensive use of fretwork, although undeniably decorative, had climatic advantages, for it offered a degree of privacy while still filtering the bright sunlight, allowing air to flow into the building and maintaining a visual connection with the outdoors.”

Historic Architecture in the Caribbean Islands by Edward E. Crain

People of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them, they went out and happened to things – Leonardo Da Vinci

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National Academy for the Performing Arts (NAPA) in Trinidad & Tobago

5” x 8.25” ink pens, in Moleskine sketchbook

This is a sketch of the National Academy of the Performing Arts in Port of Spain, Trinidad with the National Museum in the background (to the left).  I believe the concept behind the design was taken from the country’s national flower, the Chaconia.

“Experience is not what happens to you; it is what you do with what happens to you.”

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