Posts Tagged ‘italy’

St. Peters Basilica in Rome, Italy, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel

St. Peters Basilica in Rome, Italy

This is a negative of my sketch of St. Peters Basilica in Rome, Italy. You can go here to read the previous post on the Basilica here >>>.

Have a great week!!!

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This work by Vernelle Noel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

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The Church of Sant'Angese, Agone, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel

The Church of Sant'Angese in Agone, Rome

I did this sketch of the Church of St. Agnese in Rome, Italy  in 2005 while sitting in the piazza thinking, “This must be heaven.”

The Church of Sant’Agnese in Agone is a seventeenth century Baroque church in Rome. It sits along the edge of the Piazza Novona in Rome, one of the main urban spaces in the historic center of the city and the site where the Early Christian Saint Agnes was martyred in the ancient Stadium of Domitian.

The rebuilding of the church began in 1652 at the instigation of Pope Innocent X whose family palace, the Palazzo Pamphili, faced onto the piazza and was adjacent to the site of the new church. The church was to be effectively a family chapel annexed to their residence.

One of Rome’s greatest public spaces, the piazza is the site of the ancient Circus Agonalis. The piazza’s linear, curved-end shape is formed by an almost unbroken perimeter of individual buildings rising from the pavement to modest height in silent agreement as to the nature of the public space they form.

Reference: A Proper Place by James Mccrery; First Things: A Monthly Journal of Religion and Public Life, 2010

Creative Commons License
This work by Vernelle Noel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

 

St. Peters Basilica, Italy

St. Peters Basilica, Italy

This is a sketch I did of St. Peters Basilica in Rome, Italy in 2005 during my 6 weeks of back-packing throughout Europe.

“The medal by Caradosso (1506) and the partial plan drawn by Bramante (in the Uffizi, Florence), probably represent the earliest stage of the design, before the difficulties appeared which obliged the architect and his successors to propose, and in some cases implement, numerous changes. These changes related not only to the general conception of the plan—first a Greek cross, then a Latin one—but also to the plan of the transepts, which at one time were to have ambulatories; to the role of the Orders, first purely decorative (Bramante), then structural (Raphael, Michelangelo); and to the construction and shape of the dome, first with a single masonry shell (Bramante), then a double one (Sangallo, Michelangelo). The piers at the crossing, which were intended to support the dome, were one of the biggest problems; too slender in Bramante’s plan, they were frequently reinforced… In the 17th century further important modifications were made by Bernini when he created the great colonnade that encircles the Piazza San Pietro.”

— John Julius Norwich, ed. The World Atlas of Architecture. p276.

Link:
Great Buildings Online

The 30th World Wide SketchCrawl is coming up this Saturday, January 22nd 2011. I invite fellow sketchers to join me, my location will be Port of Spain, Trinidad.

Email: thinkinginsomniac@gmail.com

Creative Commons License
This work by Vernelle Noel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.