Posts Tagged ‘Abstract Architecture’

truth and its relevance

 Truth – what is said – is literal.

Design worlds are not solely literal but metaphorical, created, based on our perception, our experiences and more.

For non-verbal (what is said) versions of expression, truth is irrelevant (Goodman).

Have a great day!
Thinking Insomniac

Creative Commons License This work by Vernelle Noel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

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Yesterday I went to the 9/11 Memorial and museum in New York. Here are some photos of the memorial and the museum.

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I’ve never seen the undressed skeleton of a Calatrava.. oh this looks fantastic! Like a beast of some sort!

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Across from the memorial

TI_060314-027  A tribute to those who fell on that day

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The memorial

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I really love the form of this building

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This waterfall and pool is REALLY, REALLY fantastic. I was in awe. The sound, it’s vast size, the questions, the scale, it is powerful.

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The names of those who perished

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Entry into the museum was just like that of passing through airport security. On the right are two columns from the original World Trade Center building

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Here they tell in summary the events that happened on that day, i.e. the organized hijacking of planes from different locations and illustrate the flight paths of the planes.

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The Foundation Wall – a slurry wall built to keep water from the river out of the building’s foundation.

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Structural columns from where the first plane hit.

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Projections of the “missing” posters placed by loved ones on the days following 9/11

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Survivor’s stair

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Heading down to the exhibit floor

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Part of the communications antennae that was on top of the North Tower.

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  The North Tower’s communications antennae

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Fire Truck

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Entry into the exhibition. Photography was not allowed so I will try to describe it the best I can.

The sequence of the exhibit matches the time sequence of that day starting at 8:46 am when the first plane hit the first tower. Videos, news footage, etc. capture those minutes. The exhibit has pieces of paper from the Towers (partially burned), identification badges of employees there, metro cards used on that day, and the top news stories of that day. On the walls are also quotes by persons on that day. There are areas where audio recordings of that day are played. Small areas with seats and how nice of them, tissues at the entry. I must point out, not every audio is the same. There are several different ones so don’t leave after viewing just one.

Survivors recounting that moment when the first plane hit, what it felt like, the debris, etc. They speak of their struggle to get out, seeing firemen coming up to help, almost knowing that this was bad and they might not get out. The events at the Pentagon and Flight 93 that crashed in Pennsylvania are exhibited. The audio exhibit of the voice messages left by those on Flight 93 tore my heart. One lady called her husband and said (voice message), “Tell my children I love them [..] I hope I see you again.. I love you baby (crying as she speaks).” That one just killed me and makes me tear up as I write this.

The words of the officers guiding people out of the lobby also stuck with me, “Don’t look up! Don’t look back! Just RUN!!!!”

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    Another shot of the structural columns from the original WTC

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You can see more on the memorial’s official website here – http://www.911memorial.org/

If you can make the trip, I suggest you visit the memorial.

Thinking Insomniac

Creative Commons License This work by Vernelle Noel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

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This is my sketch from 2005 of the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona, Spain by Antonio Gaudi. I have since then learned a lot about the Sagrada Familia… particularly after a visit and presentation by Mark Burry, the Executive Architect and Researcher working on the completion of the project. He has been involved since 1979, and is still working on it today.

The expiatory church of La Sagrada Família is a work on a grand scale which was begun on 19 March 1882 from a project by the diocesan architect Francisco de Paula del Villar (1828-1901). At the end of 1883 Gaudí was commissioned to carry on the works, a task which he did not abandon until his death in 1926. Since then different architects have continued the work after his original idea.

The building is in the centre of Barcelona, and over the years it has become one of the most universal signs of identity of the city and the country. It is visited by millions of people every year and many more study its architectural and religious content.

Reference: http://www.sagradafamilia.cat/sf-eng/?lang=0

Abstract Architecture of the day:

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Visual Recipe – Greek Salad Pita Sandwich

It has been quite a while since I have posted regularly for you. Things have been busy as you know. I will be on a bit of a break (I hope) for a few weeks… so I hope to get back in the groove. It is sooooooooooo cold outside that I may need a plan B for my sketches. Today I have posted a previous Visual Recipe (Greek Salad Pita Sandwich) for you. Hope you have a great weekend, and see you again soon!

Click here for previous Greek Salad Pita post >>>

Abstract Architecture of the day:

thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, abstract architecture, michelangelo

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Abstract Architecture of the day:

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abstract architecture, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, art, design, drawing, sketch
More on Flickr >>>

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Visual Recipe - Crab Cakes

Today’s Visual Recipe is Crab Cakes with Basil Aioli, courtesy http://foodmuses.wordpress.com. Crab is one of the most delicious meats I think. When I was a kid and my mom made curried crab, or crab and callalloo, I would eat everything else first and leave the crab for last. In my early years I was not expert at eating crab. In the Caribbean we would have these relatively small blue crabs which my mom was always scared to kill. She would throw hot water on them till they stopped moving, then she graduated to giving my neighbor to kill them for her. I loved the hunt for the meat within the crab shells and felt so proud when I got a good, satisfying chunk of meat. Slurp!!!

These crab cakes seem delicious and I encourage you to try them with the Basil Aioli. Definitely sounds like a great start to the weekend! Thanks Angie!

Link to recipe >>>

Abstract Architecture for the day:

HAPPY FRIDAY!!!!

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Strasbourg, France, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, architecture, sketchblog,

Building in Strasbourg, France

This is a sketch of a building in Strasbourg, France. The city is chiefly known for its sandstone Gothic Cathedral with its famous astronomical clock, and for its medieval cityscape of Rhineland black and white timber-framed buildings, particularly in the Petite-France district alongside the Ill and in the streets and squares surrounding the cathedral. Strasbourg is the seat of the Council of Europe and the European Court of Human Rights and it hosts a seat of the European Parliament

Abstract Architecture for the day:abstract architecture, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, what if, architecture, sketch

3.5″ x 5″ Strathmore Sketchbook, ink pens and Sharpies

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Hayes Court, Trinidad

9” x 12” Strathmore sketchbook, ink pens, & Sharpies

This is a sketch of Hayes Court in Port of Spain, Trinidad. This is the second of four sketches I have done thus far of the ‘Magnificent Seven (a series of mansions by the Queen’s Park Savannah). Hayes Court is after the Queen’s Royal College. This building was completed in 1910 by the firm of Taylor Gilles at a cost of £15, 700. It was named “Hayes Court” after Bishop Thomas Hayes, who was the second Bishop of the Anglican Diocese of Trinidad & Tobago.

Hayes Court, Trinidad, vernelle noel, thinking insomniac

Hayes Court, Trinidad - Photo by Vernelle Noel

Architecturally it reflects a combination of the quiet graciousness of the French and English country house design, with its high ceilings, mahogany staircase, wrought-iron fretwork, and wood paneling. Iron fretwork and a beautiful porte cochere or coach doorway are features of this classic mansion.

Today, July 27th, is the 21st Anniversary of the attempted coup on the Government of Trinidad and Tobago in 1990. Led by Abu Bakr, the Jamaat al Muslimeen invaded The Red House (seat of the country’s parliament), and took the Prime Minister hostage, along with members of his cabinet, government and opposition MPs, and others – some seventeen in all. About 24 people died during the coup attempt, with millions in property losses. More here >>

Our Republic forever changed on that day. Our Capital City of Port of Spain, had to be rebuilt as buildings were burned, and looted. Very often I feel that as a nation, our appreciation of our history leaves much to be desired. I see it in the way we treat our historic buildings, our national heroes, and our award-winners, to name a few. This day of July 27th should never be “just another day.” We must never forget what occurred on this day, and I would like to see a stronger expression of our commemoration of this day.

I believe July 27th should embrace six major principles (adapted from the United Nations Statement of Commitment adopted for Holocaust Memorial Day):

  1. The July 27th, 1990 attempted coup shook the foundations of Trinbagonian democracy and civilization. Its horror should always hold meaning.
  2. The July 27th, 1990 attempted coup must have a permanent place in Trinbagonians’ collective memory.
  3. Future generations must understand the causes of the July 27th attempted coup and reflect upon its consequences.
  4. The sacrifices of those who lost and risked their lives to protect or rescue victims are a touchstone of the Trinbagonian capacity for good.
  5. Education and research about the July 27th attempted coup must be promoted.
  6. An annual July 27th Memorial Day should take place to commemorate this human tragedy and condemn violence, lawlessness, and indiscipline.

Reference: As Time Goes on It’s Vital We Never Forget One of the Darkest Times in World History by Dan Cohn-Sherbok

“Memorials are important because they act as historical touchstones. They link the past to the present and enable people to remember and respect the sacrifice of those who died, fought, participated or were affected by conflict(s).”

Abstract Architecture for the day:

abstract architecture, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel3.5″ x 5″ Strathmore Sketchbook, ink pens and Sharpies

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university of the west indies, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, uwi, trinidad, negative, sketch, architect

UWI Admin Building - St. Augustine, Trinidad

This is a negative of a sketch I did of the Administrative Building at the University of the West Indies in St. Augustine, Trinidad. Here is the original sketch >>>.

Abstract Architecture for the day:

 

abstract architecture, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel

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