thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, negative, architecture

This is a negative of a building I drew in 1997 that I saw in a magazine. See the original Post here >>>.

The sketch, for an architect, may allow for the discovery of a concept at the beginning of a project; however, they can be employed in all stages of the design process, even as an observational recording long after the building is constructed. In early stages, an architect’s imagination is open to many possibilities; no potentiality is ruled out (Casey, 1976). These options might be fragmented and vague, but they begin a thinking process, as this first sketch often must be drawn with great speed to capture the rapid flashes of mental stimulation. Werner Oechslin feels the sketch is the appropriate medium for design: ‘The sketch is ideally suited for capturing the fleetingness of an idea’ . If the sketch itself is a brief  outline, then it may, in fact, reflect the brief thoughts of the mind.

Architects depend upon sketches as the medium for the creative process they employ to conceptualize architecture. Since they are easily transformable images, they play a major role in architectural thinking; they form and deform architectural ideas. This flexibility affects architectural understanding, and the comprehension requires reflection and translation. Sketches are the visual manifestation of character or attitude that allows the transformation of a physical object or concept into another dimension or media. Exploring the representational qualities of sketches discloses the tangible and intangible aspects that make them fundamental in any process of design.

ARCHITECTS’ DRAWINGS – A Selection of Sketches by World Famous Architects Through History by Kendra Schank Smith

Abstract Architecture for the day:

I Will and IQ, thinking insomniac, vernelle noel, abstract architecture

Click for more sketches >>>

Creative Commons License
This work by Vernelle Noel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

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